Why Financial Awards Are Changed in Personal Injury Cases

After a personal injury trial, a jury may find that you are entitled to compensation from people or entities who caused your injuries to occur. However, those parties have the right to appeal that decision. In some case, a judge may agree to reduce or throw out a jury verdict. Let’s look at why this may happen.

Personal Injury Awards Could Be Seen as Excessively Large

Juries are known to create personal injury awards to send a message to corporations or others who consider lawsuits to be simply a cost of doing business. However, such awards must generally be reasonable based on the facts of the case. For instance, if an accident resulted in a $1,000 hospital bill, an award of $1 million is unlikely to stand.

The Wrong Party or Parties Are Held Liable

It isn’t uncommon for multiple parties to be held liable in a lawsuit. For instance, an employer may be held liable if an employee hurts someone in a car accident. However, there may not be enough evidence that the employer did anything to put you in harm’s way when the collision occurred. Therefore, a judge may decide to throw out a financial award or order that settlement talks continue.

It May Be a Good Idea to Seek Counsel

If you have been hurt, it may be worth talking to one or more personal injury attorneys. Doing so may make it possible to determine how much your case could be worth and how to go about getting that money. Your attorney may also be able to help you decide whether to pursue settlement talks as opposed to seeking a jury trial.